Università degli Studi di Urbino Carlo Bo / Portale Web di Ateneo


WORK AND WORKERS IN ROMAN LAW
LAVORO E LAVORATORI IN DIRITTO ROMANO

A.Y. Credits
2017/2018 6
Lecturer Email Office hours for students
Marina Frunzio Thursday and Friday at the end of the lessons
Teaching in foreign languages
Course with optional materials in a foreign language English
This course is entirely taught in Italian. Study materials can be provided in the foreign language and the final exam can be taken in the foreign language.

Assigned to the Degree Course

Law degree for labour Consultancy and safety at work (L-14)
Curriculum: PERCORSO COMUNE
Giorno Orario Aula
Giorno Orario Aula

Learning Objectives

The course aims to provide the tools necessary to understand the cultural origins of the concept of work. The student will find in the classical Roman history the legal, political and cultural factors that have led to the further development of labor relations in the modern and contemporary world.

Program

The course is divided into a first 16-hour general part, in which the student will begin to understand the basic institutions of Roman private law, in particular Ownership and Possession.

The following will be deepened: a) The origins of relationships of belonging; B) the formation of the dominium; C) the protection of Possession. Therefore, the main private contracts will be considered for work performance and relating to free or servile parties: a) formal contracts; B) real contracts; C) sinallagmatic consensual contracts, in particular, leasing (of works and agrarian); Bond of subordination. Free subjects, people in servile condition; The phenomenon of slavery.
In the second part, of 18 hours, the most important issues related to the work of the Republican and Classical Roman law, examined in a comparative key, will be discussed. In particular, we will look at:
-The concept of work in republican and classical antiquity: intellectual work and manual work.
-The causes of the social disillusionment of the 'work' phenomenon: its possible explanation on the historical level.
-The testimony of the philosophers of Greek antiquity: Plato and Aristotle.
-The influence of the Greek mentality on the Roman one: Cicero.
- Jurists and Attorneys.
-Architects and technicians: the case of Vitruvio.
-The alleged economic stagnation of Roman society.
-Conditioned to work in mines.

Bridging Courses

Reasoned study and partecipation in working class

Learning Achievements (Dublin Descriptors)

The student must : 

-demonstrate the basic knowledges to grasp the working relationships in their complexity and historicity ((KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING)

 -recognize and be able to analyze the relationship work , finding in it the rights and duties and their origin in terms of legal history, and supporting personal arguments (APPLYING KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING)

-understand the milestones that led to the formation of modern labor law, integrating and interpreting rilevant data (MAKING JUDGEMENTS)

-Show to have the cultural tools sufficient to identify the problems inside the historical evolution of legal phenomena working,properly taking the necessary information, formulating ideas, and providing solutions to the problems, even in context of working class (COMMUNICATION SKILLS)

Show to possess the methodological techniques to move within the different cultural components ( legal, economic , philosophical ) that enrich the history of labor law, and demonstrate to have acquired the skills to study with a high degree of autonomy (LEARNING SKILLS).

Teaching Material

The teaching material prepared by the lecturer in addition to recommended textbooks (such as for instance slides, lecture notes, exercises, bibliography) and communications from the lecturer specific to the course can be found inside the Moodle platform › blended.uniurb.it

Supporting Activities

Material by the teacher


Didactics, Attendance, Course Books and Assessment

Didactics

Lectures ; midterm written test ; Group work ; seminars.

Attendance

In-depth study and active participation in group activities.

Course books

A. GUARINO, PROFILO DEL DIRITTO ROMANO (ED. JOVENE, 1994), PAG. 9-195, excluding  paragr. 18.

M. FRUNZIO, LAVORARE AI TEMPI DI VITRUVIO (ED. CAROCCI, 2014

Assessment

Oral examination and written test.

 The choice of the oral mode responds to the need to assess the achievement of an adequate critical spirit and of a clear and scientifically correct language.

The expected learning results will be evaluated by means of an oral exam, based on three questions or more. The evaluation criteria and the scale of marks are as follows:

less than 18/30: competence level insufficient. The student doesn’t reach the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”.

18-20/30: competence level sufficient. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”.

21-23/30: competence level satisfactory. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding” and in “applied knowledge and understanding”.

24-26/30: competence level good. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”, “applied knowledge and understanding” and “making judgments”.

27-29/30: competence level very good. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”, “applied knowledge and understanding”, “making judgments” and “communication skills”.

30-30 with honours: competence level excellent. The student fully attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”, “applied knowledge and understanding”, “making judgments” and “learning skills”.

Midway through the course, a written test will be carried out, which will consist of a two-hour long essay in which the student will have to argue his observations with respect to a given question. It aims to ascertain the existence of problems arisen during the first part of the course and does not impact the outcome of the final exam in any way. Marks will range between 18 (pass) and 30-30 cum laude (highest mark). The results will be discussed with individual students and then collectively commented in a general way. These indivdual conversations will also serve to recommend the student on how to improve.

Additional Information for Non-Attending Students

Didactics

Students not attending are encouraged to contact the teacher- via email -to arrange an appointment where they are needed clarification or to present any , specific needs . They will find more in-depth material on the Moodle platform.

Attendance

Self-contained study in in-depth form.

Course books

The textbooks are the same as for students attending.

Assessment

Oral examination.

The expected learning results will be evaluated by means of an oral exam, based on three questions or more. The evaluation criteria and the scale of marks are as follows:

less than 18/30: competence level insufficient. The student doesn’t reach the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”.

18-20/30: competence level sufficient. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”.

21-23/30: competence level satisfactory. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding” and in “applied knowledge and understanding”.

24-26/30: competence level good. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”, “applied knowledge and understanding” and “making judgments”.

27-29/30: competence level very good. In particular, the student attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”, “applied knowledge and understanding”, “making judgments” and “communication skills”.

30-30 with honours: competence level excellent. The student fully attains the learning results described in “knowledge and understanding”, “applied knowledge and understanding”, “making judgments” and “learning skills”.

Notes

However there is no obligation to attend , it is recommended strongly participating in the lessons.

In the Department is active the 'Olympus Observatory for the permanent monitoring of legislation and case law on safety in the workplace'. It carries out various activities including, in particular: - the management of a website with legislative databases, case law and contractual requirements concerning safety in the workplace; - Depth articles, specialized reviews and "focus" theme; - The management of an online scientific journal - "The Working Papers of Olympus", shortly destined to mutate into "Diritto alla sicurezza sul lavoro" (DSL) - in the field of law of security in the workplace, with ISSN, which makes use of a large international scientific committee and refereeing procedures for the identification of essays to be published; - The organization of events congresses and seminars including international. This observatory, whose website is freely accessible to all in a logic of public service, allows students of the Study course to find useful materials and documentation to study and draft the dissertation. It offers, also, through the mentioned congresses meetings and seminars, the opportunity to meet with leading experts in the field and a full analysis of the most sensitive issues relating to it.

(Http://olympus.uniurb.it/)

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