Università degli Studi di Urbino Carlo Bo / Portale Web di Ateneo


HISTORY OF ART LITERATURE
STORIA DELLA CRITICA D'ARTE

A.Y. Credits
2019/2020 12
Lecturer Email Office hours for students
Giovanna Perini Folesani

Assigned to the Degree Course

Art History (LM-89)
Curriculum: PERCORSO COMUNE
Giorno Orario Aula
Giorno Orario Aula

Learning Objectives

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Program

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Bridging Courses

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Learning Achievements (Dublin Descriptors)

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Teaching Material

The teaching material prepared by the lecturer in addition to recommended textbooks (such as for instance slides, lecture notes, exercises, bibliography) and communications from the lecturer specific to the course can be found inside the Moodle platform › blended.uniurb.it

Supporting Activities

. Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 


Didactics, Attendance, Course Books and Assessment

Didactics

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Attendance

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Course books

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Assessment

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Additional Information for Non-Attending Students

Didactics

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Attendance

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Course books

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Assessment

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

Notes

Time is precious. a rare and limited commodity. Researchers should devote it first and foremost to research, then to teaching. Increasing bureucratic loads, unpaid, should always be avoided, especially when unnecessary or, worse, self-damaging, like in this case. Italian students are notorious for their average ignorance of foreign languages (as certified by information provided by the Italian Ministry of Education), so this section is not addressed to them. As for foreign students, Italian scholarship in the humanities has long reached outstanding levels in its own language, Italian. Whoever is interested in learning Italian methods in research (at least in the humanities) should also speak Italian fluently. For centuries (16th-18th at least) Italian was the language of culture throughout Europe. Whoever wishes to attend classes in Italy should be fluent in Italian. Any nation endowed with self-respect (from Slovenia to Quebec) invests precious money in preserving her language. Only Italy and her Ministries of Culture have set up an infernal machine destroying our excellence to the obvious benefit of third (foreign) parties. This is unacceptable and is also against the constitutional rights of University professors. It is not only a right, but a moral duty to abstain from complying with unacceptable impositions. It is obviously correct to ask academics to speak and/or understand some foreign languages, but it is degrading to oblige them surreptistiously to comply with impositions that help lower our international standing in the humanities. I think I have hereby proven that I can speak English fluently, but I do refuse to waste my time translating everything I have written in Italian into a different language, granting English (or French, or German) a position which was and should still be ours.  In case, improve the standards of our students' Italian: it is usually pathetic. If you can't master your mothertongue, you shall never be able to cope with a foreign one. And you shall never be able to express or even form your own thoughts correctly. This is the real issue about University teaching. 

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